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Planners Claim Reduction in Car Pollution, but Details Show Overall Increase

Inscrutable “per capita” and “business as usual” comparisons hide rise in total greenhouse gases
Essentially, it’s a math trick: The per capita figure hides a predicted regional population growth of 28 percent. That means total passenger vehicle emissions regionwide would actually rise by 9.1 percent — an indication that regional planning is not helping California’s efforts to become a model in combating climate change.
This story is part of a special report on climate change in the Summer print edition of the San Francisco Public Press.

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Big-Time Preservation, Thanks to Carbon Credits

A 19,000-acre area in Sonoma County is spared from vineyard and housing development
Carbon credits were essential to funding the big costs that come along with managing such large tracts. The nonprofit’s best estimate is that the credits will yield “several hundred thousand dollars” in annual income, based on similar deals on other parcels. This story is part of a special report on climate change in the summer print edition of the San Francisco Public Press.

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We need to raise $40,000 by the end of this year so we can continue producing independent local news online, on the air and in print. Thanks to the generosity of the many foundations supporting this year’s national NewsMatch initiative, donations we receive through December will be matched dollar for dollar. Your financial support makes our work possible.

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California’s Market for Hard-to-Verify Carbon Offsets Could Let Industry Pollute as Usual

Timber, dairy and chemical companies are lining up to sell  carbon credits, which regulators call “offsets,” to the largest California polluters so they can compensate for their greenhouse gas emissions. Many environmentalists say that because it is notoriously difficult to prove that such projects actually reduce the state’s overall carbon footprint, California should proceed slowly in approving a vast expansion of the cap-and-trade market. This story is part of a special report on climate change in the summer print edition of the San Francisco Public Press.

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We need to raise $40,000 by the end of this year so we can continue producing independent local news online, on the air and in print. Thanks to the generosity of the many foundations supporting this year’s national NewsMatch initiative, donations we receive through December will be matched dollar for dollar. Your financial support makes our work possible.

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European, U.S. Climate Policies Trail California’s

As California pushes forward on a wide range of aggressive goals to curb its contribution to climate change, the same solution that’s the centerpiece of the state’s effort — a cap-and-trade market for carbon emissions — is moving forward in a big way on the international stage. The European Union voted Wednesday to strengthen the role of the continental cap-and-trade system. But, as the New York Times reported, the union is far from unified on the issue. Many fear cap-and-trade would burden the European economy — in part because the U.S. has failed to pass its own federal cap-and-trade scheme.

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We need to raise $40,000 by the end of this year so we can continue producing independent local news online, on the air and in print. Thanks to the generosity of the many foundations supporting this year’s national NewsMatch initiative, donations we receive through December will be matched dollar for dollar. Your financial support makes our work possible.

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Carbon Storage Could Aid Climate, but at What Cost?

While building a power plant in Southern California that buries carbon dioxide underground can help the industry meet California’s greenhouse gas and gas reduction goals, local concerns regarding health effects and air pollutants challenge the project’s environmental claims.
This story is part of a special report on climate change in the Summer print edition of the San Francisco Public Press.

We Need You

We need to raise $40,000 by the end of this year so we can continue producing independent local news online, on the air and in print. Thanks to the generosity of the many foundations supporting this year’s national NewsMatch initiative, donations we receive through December will be matched dollar for dollar. Your financial support makes our work possible.

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Mapping California’s Biggest Polluters

Carbon dioxide, as everyone knows, is invisible. But with a little mapmaking magic, the greenhouse gas comes into sharp view in a rainbow of colors, and shows clearly how and where California contributes to global warming. California’s cap-and-trade program requires the largest emitters of greenhouse gases to pay to pollute. Each metric ton of carbon dioxide (or other greenhouse gas equivalent) requires an “allowance,” with the total supply (the “cap”) falling each year. These maps show the largest emitters. This is part of a special report on climate change in the Summer print edition of the San Francisco Public Press.

We Need You

We need to raise $40,000 by the end of this year so we can continue producing independent local news online, on the air and in print. Thanks to the generosity of the many foundations supporting this year’s national NewsMatch initiative, donations we receive through December will be matched dollar for dollar. Your financial support makes our work possible.

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